Skin of Color Update Announces 2019 Didactic, Case-Based Lectures, Hands-On-Training and Live Demonstrations

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The medical education event focused on the dermatologic treatment of skin of color has a new name. Skin of Color Update, previously the Skin of Color Seminar Series, provides dermatologists with evidence-based research and practical pearls in treating skin of color, including patients with multiracial backgrounds.

“Just as the treatment of skin of color has evolved, this event has also evolved,” says Skin of Color Update co-chair and founding dermatologist Eliot Battle, MD. “Thanks to audience feedback, nearly all general sessions will have additional time for Q&A, making this year’s event the most interactive yet.”

Skin of Color Update will now be held annually in the fall. The 2019 event will be held September 7 and 8 at the Crowne Plaza Times Square in New York.

Skin of Color Update uses a didactic, case-based approach through lectures, hands-on-training and live demonstrations. Co-founding dermatologist Andrew Alexis, MD, also serves as an event co-chair. Common skin, hair and nail conditions in diverse populations will be covered. In addition, advanced treatment protocols for pigmentary and hair disorders will be shared during mini symposiums.

Sessions will address medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. New sessions include:

  • “Challenging Challenges: Hidradenitis Suppurativa and the Skin of Color Patient” with Ted Rosen, MD
  • “Current Understanding and Novel Innovations in Photoprotection” with Henry Lim, MD
  • “Diagnosis and Management of Vitiligo in Skin of Color Patients: Where Do We Stand?” with Pearl Grimes, MD
  • Laser and Device-Based Treatment of Scars” with Paul Friedman, MD
  • “Surgical Approaches for Keloids” with Maritza Perez, MD

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View the full agenda

Patient Buzz: At-Home Laser Hair Removal – The Expert Weighs In

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Marie Clairerecently posted a list of the magazine’s top devices for at-home laser hair removal, noting their budget-friendly appeal. But are these devices safe and effective? How should you counsel your patients?

For an expert opinion, I consulted dermatologist Eliot F. Battle Jr., MD, CEO and co-founder of Cultura Dermatology & Laser Center in Washington, D.C., clinical instructor in the Howard University Department of Dermatology, and Co-Chair of the Skin of Color Update.

How do at-home laser hair removal devices compare in effectiveness with in-office laser hair removal?

At-home laser hair removal devices have now been available for more than a decade. Just like most gadgets, you get what you pay for, so buyer beware. The devices range from using an intense pulsed light source to using actual diode lasers, although with a much lower energy source then office-based devices. Regardless of which device patients choose, at-home devices do not compare with the efficacy and speed of office-based laser systems. At-home devices are very slow. Because of the amount of time it takes to treat an area and their decrease in efficacy as compared with office-based lasers, I view at-home devices more as “hair-growth delay” devices than “hair-reduction” devices. They can be used alone or as maintenance treatments to office-based hair removal. The main limitations are they are best utilized on smaller areas and are contraindicated on patients with skin of color or tanned skin.

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Skin of Color Update Co-Chair Dr. Eliot Battle Shares Insights into 2019 Faculty and Topics

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Skin of Color Update Co-Chair, Dr. Eliot Battle, discusses the elite faculty lineup and topics planned this year including hair loss, keloids, rosacea, acne, lasers, aesthetic treatments, skin cancer, medical dermatology, melasma, hyperpigmentation, vitiligo, inflammatory diseases and much, much more!

Skin of Color Update 2019 (previously Skin of Color Seminar Series) is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI. Attendees leave with critical annual updates and fresh practical pearls in skin of color dermatology.

Join us this year in New York City, September 7-8, 2019! Register today at https://skinofcolorupdate.com/registration-hotel-2019/

Co-Chair Dr. Alexis Shares the Exciting 2019 Program Highlights

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Skin of Color Update 2019 (previously Skin of Color Seminar Series) is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI. Attendees leave with critical annual updates and fresh practical pearls in skin of color dermatology. Earn CE in New York City with direct access to elite experts and an experience unmatched by any other event in dermatology.

Medical Updates in Skin of Color

Medical Updates in Skin of Color

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During the 16th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetics and Surgical Conference, ANGELO LANDRISCINA, MD had the pleasure of taking part in the Resident Career Development Mentorship Program (a program supported by an educational grant from Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.). and was paired with Dr. Andrew Alexis, Co-Chair of the Skin of Color Update.

Dr. Alexis lectured on new developments in the treatment of skin of color focusing on two prevalent conditions: hyperpigmentation and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA). Below are Dr. Landriscina’s takeaways and pearls from this lecture.

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The Skin Lightening Dilemma: A Candid Conversation with the Experts

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This article features a recap of the Skin Lightening Panel at the 2018 Skin of Color Seminar Series, now known as the Skin of Color Update. Dr. Bridget Kaufman, onsite correspondent for the meeting, shares highlights directly from the experts, Drs. Eliot Battle, Seemal Desai and Valerie Callender.

Each panelist started with a PowerPoint presentation on skin lightening, followed by a panel discussion. Rather than reporting on the session chronologically, I have divided the session into key points. Under each key point, I have indicated each faculty member’s contributions and opinions on the topic.  *Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined and marked with asterisks.

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2018 Scientific Poster Abstracts from Skin of Color Update

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A selection of scientific poster abstracts from Skin of Color Seminar Series 2018 (now known as Skin of Color Update.) Thank you to our poster presentations and faculty. 


 

Cutaneous Crohn’s Disease of the Vulva in an Elderly African American Patient

Authors: Leah Wells, MS & David Kent, MD

We present a case of a 79-year-old African American female with painful vulvar ulcers of several years duration. She presented to an OB-GYN and was tested for syphilis, lymphoproliferative granulomatosis, herpes, TB, and fungal infection. Once these etiologies were ruled out, she was referred to dermatology where the knife-like lesions prompted suspicion for cutaneous Crohn’s disease. However, the patient had not been previously diagnosed with Crohn’s and had no gastrointestinal symptoms of the disease. Biopsy revealed non-caseating granulomas, confirming a probable diagnosis of vulvar Crohn’s. The patient was initially treated with oral steroids, and her lesions showed improvement after one month of therapy. Due to the severity of her case, infliximab was recently added to her regimen to further promote healing.
Less than 200 cases of vulvar Crohn’s disease have been reported in the literature. The mean age of onset is 35, making our patient’s advanced age uncommon. Vulvar Crohn’s is often difficult to diagnose, due to the multitude of differential diagnoses for genital ulcers. Further, a significant amount of patients with vulvar Crohn’s disease will not exhibit any gastrointestinal symptoms and vulvar Crohn’s will be the initial manifestation of underlying disease. As a result, many patients suffer from the disease for many years before it is recognized as cutaneous Crohn’s. A biopsy is necessary to achieve definite diagnosis.
Treatment recommendations for vulvar Crohn’s have not been well-established. However, initial treatment often includes metronidazole, steroids, and/or immunosuppressants. Recent case-reports have shown success in treating severe, or refractory, vulvar Crohn’s with infliximab.  Read More

Seemal Desai Melasma Skin of Color Update

Melasma and PIH – Disorders of Hyperpigmentation

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During his talk at the 2018 Skin of Color Seminar Series (now known as the Skin of Color Update), Dr. Seemal Desai discussed the treatment of melasma with a particular emphasis on new and emerging therapies. Dr. Bridget Kaufman, onsite correspondent for the meeting, shares highlights directly from the talk.  *Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined, and marked with asterisks.

Dr. Desai started by stressing the importance of having an honest and upfront conversation with your melasma patients about realistic expectations for treatment. *You must emphasize to patients that this is a chronic condition and set their expectations accordingly.*While improvement with treatment is likely, there will always be underlying pigmentary changes even despite treatment. Patients must understand from the beginning that they cannot be cured of this condition.

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Excerpt provided with permission. Originally published by Next Steps in Dermatology. All rights reserved.
Skin of Color STD Ted Rosen

Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Skin of Color: Crisis State

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As one would expect, Dr. Ted Rosen’s session at the Skin of Color Seminar Series 2018 (now Skin of Color Update) on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in Skin of Color was engaging, informative, and shocking to many in the audience. Dr. Rosen addressed the increasing rates of STDs in the United States and highlighted the alarming predominance in non-white ethnic groups.

*Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined, and marked with asterisks.

The STD data from 2017 is worse than 2016, which was worse than 2015, and so on. *Every year, 20×106new STDs are diagnosed!*Over 50% of Americans will contract an STD during their lifetime, often before the age of 25. Teenagers are at high risk as well, with 1 in 4 teenagers developing an STD. First piece of good news: *Sex in high school is decreasing*in the US, with the exception of a few states(from east to west): North Carolina, Michigan, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Arizona. Perhaps this will correlate with decreased STD transmission among teenagers in the coming years.

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Excerpt provided with permission. Originally published by Next Steps in Dermatology. All rights reserved.

The Use of Deoxycholic Acid for the Clinical Reduction of Excess Submental Fat in Indian Patients

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Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(3):266-272.

Debraj Shome MD FRCS, FACS, MBA Stuti Khare MD, Rinky Kapoor MD

The injectable adipocytolytic drug deoxycholic acid (DCA) is the first pharmacological intervention approved for the reduction of submental fat (SMF) and offers an alternative to invasive measures to improve the submental profile and the cervico-mental angle. DCA injection (ATX-101, Kybella [United States], Belkyra [Canada]; Kythera Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., Westlake Village, CA, acquired by Allergan, Inc.), are proprietary formulations of synthetically derived DCA that is FDA approved for improvement in the appearance of moderate to severe convexity or fullness associated with SMF.

Aim: As none of the aforementioned are available in India, we undertook this study to study the efficacy of generic DCA for SMF reduction in Indian patients.

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Latino JDD Rendon

Dermatological Concerns in the Latino Population

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Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(3 Suppl):s112-114. 

Marta I. Rendon MD 

The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) published a supplement on the dermatological concerns in the Latino population authored by Marta I. Rendon, MD.

The Latino, or Hispanics in the United States, are the drivers behind demographic growth. They are heterogeneous in many dimensions related to health risks and dermatological conditions. Understanding the heterogeneity and clinical manifestation of skin concerns in such population is essential for health care providers. At the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in 2018, Dr. Rendon chaired a special symposium titled “Skin Issues in Latino Patients”, with the objective of training clinical practitioners how to better provide care and education to our diverse patients.

Click “Download Original Article” here

  • Introduction: Dermatological Concerns in the Latino Population Marta I. Rendon MD
  • Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Hispanic Population in the United States Marta I. Rendon MD
  • Disorders of Hypopigmentation Yemisi Dina BS, Jacqueline McKesey MD MS, Amit G. Pandya MD
  • Skin Cancer in Hispanics in the United States Maritza I. Perez MD
  • Photoaging and Photoprotection in United States Hispanic Population Qian Zheng MD PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, and Michele Verschoore MD
  • Acne and Rosacea: Special Considerations in the Treatment of Patients With Latin American Ancestry Mercedes Florez-White MD
  • Cosmetic Laser Procedures in Latin Skin Sheila Jalalat MD, Eduardo Weiss MD
Skin of Color Update CCCA

Pearls from Primary Cicatricial Alopecias in Black Women

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Hair Apparent: A Multi-Part Series on Hair Disorders – Part II

Dermatology residents from throughout the Washington DC area recently convened at a recent hair disorders symposium, where distinguished experts in the field of hair disorders discussed the evaluation, work-up, and treatment of a wide variety of alopecias and scalp disorders. A treasure trove of clinical pearls was shared along the way, and the attendees learned a host of new strategies to apply to the management of hair loss, which is both widely prevalent and frequently undertreated. Attend Skin of Color Update in to learn more or continuing reading below.

This post is the second of a multi-part series that summarizes salient points from each of the lectures, as well as strategies that residents can add to their alopecia armamentarium.

 

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Seborrheic Dermatitis in Skin of Color: Clinical Considerations

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Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(1):24-27.

May Elgash BS, Ncoza Dlova MBChB FCDerm PhD, Temitayo Ogunleye MD, Susan C. Taylor MD

Skin of Color Update 2019 faculty Susan C. Taylor, MD and colleagues published a paper in the January 2019 issue of the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology on seborrheic dermatitis in skin of color.  Read the abstract below or login in to JDD for the full manuscript.

Abstract: Seborrheic dermatitis is a common, relapsing, inflammatory skin condition of unclear etiology. The Malassezia yeast genus are believed to play a role. Seborrheic dermatitis commonly affects areas of the skin with high sebum production, including the scalp, nasolabial folds, glabella, eyebrows, beard, ears, retroauricular skin, sternum, and other skin folds. Seborrheic dermatitis may present differently in individuals with skin of color. Darker-skinned individuals may present with scaly, hypopigmented macules and patches in typical areas of involvement. Arcuate or petal-like patches may be seen, specifically termed petaloid seborrheic dermatitis. Children of color often do not experience the classic “cradle cap” appearance of seborrheic dermatitis, and have erythema, flaking, and hypopigmentation of the affected areas and folds of skin. Seborrheic dermatitis tends to respond well to conventional treatments, although it tends to recur. Skin of color patients may require a modified treatment approach which takes into account differences in hair texture and hair washing frequency. This paper aims to highlight these differences to help reduce disparities in the management of seborrheic dermatitis in patients of color. To read the full manuscript with your JDD subscription, click here.

Hair disorders skin of color update

Clinical Approach to Hair Loss in Pediatric Patients

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Physicians from throughout the Washington DC area recently convened at a hair disorders symposium, where distinguished experts in the field of hair disorders discussed the evaluation, work-up, and treatment of a wide variety of alopecias and scalp disorders. A treasure trove of clinical pearls was shared along the way, and the attendees learned a host of new strategies to apply to the management of hair loss, which is both widely prevalent and frequently undertreated.

This is an excerpt from a multi-part series on Next Steps in Dermatology that summarizes salient points from each of the lectures, as well as strategies that physicians can add to their alopecia armamentarium.

This post is devoted to Dr. Leslie Castelo-Soccio’s lecture, “Clinical approach to hair loss in pediatric patients.” Dr. Castelo-Soccio is a pediatric dermatologist as well as the Dermatology Section’s Director of Clinical Research at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. She is an expert in alopecia as well as genetic skin disease. Her lecture provided an incredibly useful roadmap for residents learning to navigate the following aspects of caring for the pediatric alopecia patient…

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Clinical Evaluation of Safety and Efficacy of Fractional Radiofrequency Facial Treatment of Skin Type VI Patients

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Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2018;17(11):1169-1172.

Eliot F. Battle Jr. MD and Sally Battle CNMT

We are excited to highlight a November 2018 published in the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology by our very own co-founder, Eliot F. Battle, MD.   The study was intended to evaluate the safety and efficacy of fractional RF technology for the treatment of patients with Fitzpatrick skin type VI. We recommend you read the abstract or login with your JDD subscription for the full manuscript here.