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Skin of Color Update Agenda

Skin of Color in Psoriasis Pearls from SOC Update

Psoriasis in Skin of Color: Pearls from SOC Update

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Andrew Alexis, MD, MPH, co-chair and co-founder of Skin of Color Update presented on Psoriasis in Skin of Color this past event.

Previously thought to be rare in patients of African ancestry, the prevalence of psoriasis is 1.6% in African Americans and 1.4% in Hispanics.

The talk, “Psoriasis: Distinct Clinical Features and Treatment Options of Psoriasis Patients of Color, ” was one of the top rated lectures of Skin of Color Update.

The lecture focused on the fundamentals of dermatology with an emphasis on several key characteristics.

  1. Color and distribution in the clinical presentation
  2. Recognizing common medical mimickers of psoriasis such as lichen planus, sarcoidosis, and cutaneous lupus erythematosus (.e. discoid lupus) in skin of color
  3. When in doubt, do not hesitate to biopsy

During the lecture, Dr. Alexis presented a game of “Psoriasis or Not?” allowing the audience to guess if the Kodachrome was psoriasis.  This illustrated the vast presentation of psoriasis and how papulosquamous disorders can be challenging to differentiate in skin of color.

To read more about this lecture and psoriasis in skin of color, visit the full article on Next Steps in Derm.

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Acne in Skin of Color Alexis

Acne in Skin of Color: What’s New and What’s to Come

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At Skin of Color Update 2019, our co-chair and co-founder, Andrew Alexis, MD, MPH  gave a lecture on Acne: What’s New and What’s to Come?  Our onsite correspondent, Kimberly Huerth, MD, M. Ed, provided the following recap of this is insightful session.  The read the full article, please visit Next Steps in Derm website.   Missed Skin of Color Update 2019? Purchase lectures like this on-demand

By: Kimberly Huerth, MD, M. Ed

I still treat my acne twice daily with a whole cabinet full of various topicals. I’ve tried and failed doxycycline because it disrupts every single molecule of bacterial flora in my body. I’ve tried and failed spironolactone because I was the poster child for nearly all of its annoying and inconvenient side effects. I’ve tried and failed several OCPs because my body was a little too convinced by the estrogen and progesterone that it was actually pregnant, and decided to make me persistently sleepy and nauseous. I could put the 650-microsecond Nd:YAG that we have in clinic to use, but can’t bring myself to bother my co-rezzys (or myself) at the end of a long day seeing patients. And yes, I’ve already done a course of isotretinoin…two courses in fact. And no, I don’t have PCOS. So when I settled in to hear Dr. Andrew Alexis’s lecture on Acne in Skin of Color: What’s new and what’s to come?, I was excited for some new strategies with which to help my patients, and myself.

Dr. Alexis not only shared expert insights and strategies on how to optimize treatment for acne in skin of color (SOC) patients, but he also laid out an overview of some of the new and emerging acne treatments that we will presently be able to add to our armamentarium!

This article will provide an overview of the following:

  • Understanding the unique presentation and needs of SOC patients with acne
  • Sarecycline, a new tetracycline class antibiotic
  • New topical acne medications in the pipeline

But first, let me share a few of the “A-ha” moments that I experienced during Dr. Alexis’s lecture, in the hope that they will entice you to read on…

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Skin of Color Update On Demand Video

SOC Update Launches On-Demand Package

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New York (Nov. 5, 2019) Skin of Color Update launches on-demand video package. Skin of Color Update, the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI expands educational offerings to include on-demand videos.

The demand for skin of color dermatology education is greater than Skin of Color Update’s ability to accommodate onsite. Therefore, SanovaWorks has produced and launched a Best of Skin of Color Update video package.  The video content is comprised of the highest attendee rated sessions of Skin of Color Update 2019.  On-demand videos include top-rated faculty lectures in-sync with PPT slides with accompanying audio files.

On-demand Lectures include:

  • Pearls for the Diagnosis and Treatment of Atopic Dermatitis and Eczema with Andrew Alexis, MD, MPH
  • Complex Medical Cases with Andrew Alexis, MD, MPH and Ted Rosen, MD
  • Surgical Approaches for Keloids with Maritza Perez, MD
  • Hair & Scalp Disorders Treatment Strategies: What, How and When? with Heather Woolery-Lloyd, MD
  • Pearls and Strategies for Preventing Laser Complications with Eliot F. Battle, Jr., MD.

The video content focuses on expert techniques, real-life clinical cases and expert pearls immediately useful in the practice.  For a video preview, click here.

Purchase the on-demand Best of Skin of Color Update video package and start learning from the experts today.

Skin of Color Update On Demand Video

Aesthetic Skin of Color

Consensus and Misconceptions Regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer

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Each month the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology JDD Podcast discusses a current issue in dermatology. During the month of September, podcast host Dr. Adam Friedman sat down with Skin of Color Update 2019 co-chair and co-founder,  Dr. Andrew Alexis, Chair of Dermatology at Mt. Sinai St. Lukes and Mount Sinai West to discuss misconceptions regarding the aesthetic skin of color consumer.

Dr. Angela Hou, PGY-3 dermatology resident at George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences, shares key takeaways from Dr. Alexis’ JDD podcast titled ‘Capturing Consensus and Cutting Out misconceptions regarding the Aesthetic Skin of Color Consumer’.

Here is an excerpt recently published on our media partner, Next Steps in Dermatology.

Key Takeaways

  • There has been a rapid increase in the past 10 years in Fitzpatrick Skin Type IV-VI patient’s seeking aesthetic skin care, however the guidelines for skin of color is limited and more clarification and guidance is needed
  • This article helps reduce the gap in knowledge in regard to skin of color. This was difficult given the lack of evidence-based studies, therefore expert consensus was necessary for deciding on recommendations.
  • A common myth is that darker-skinned patients of African descent do not seek or need injectable fillers of the lips. Although lip enhancement is less common than in other populations, restoration of lip volume is still an important aesthetic concern, albeit at an older age than among Caucasian patients
  • Another knowledge gap is regarding skin of color patients with a history of keloids and the risks of developing keloids after filler injections. However, per the expert consensus, there are no known cases of keloids induced by soft tissue filler injections. Therefore, keloids should not be an absolute contraindication to fillers and should be evaluated on a case-by-case basis.
  • To read more of the key takeaways and words from the investigator, read the full article here.

To hear the JDD podcast, click here.

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Dermatology Concerns In Skin of Color Patients

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During the 16th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetics and Surgical Conference, I had the pleasure of taking part in the Resident Career Development Mentorship Program (a program supported by an educational grant from Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.). and was paired with Dr. Andrew Alexis, Chair of Dermatology at Mount Sinai St. Luke’s and Mount Sinai West in New York City.

During a 45-minute working group session, Dr. Alexis covered three main themes: common dermatologic disorders with unique manifestations in skin of color, disorders that disproportionately affect patients of color and therapeutic nuances and unique treatment concerns in skin of color. Here are the main takeaways and pearls from this session.

Common Disorders With Unique Manifestations

Acne

Post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation is a major concern in patients of color and many times more bothersome than acne itself.  It is important to use agents that will treat both acne and PIH. Retinoids can be very effective –tretinoin, tazarotene and adapalene have been shown effect for PIH. Azelaic acid can be a good add on for patients with PIH.

Dr. Alexis doesn’t use much hydroquinone for these patients – the macules left behind by acne are usually too small to avoid creating halos around the lesion.  Chemical peels have been demonstrated to improve PIH in small studies.  The risks are higher in skin of color, so it advisable to stick to superficial peeling agents. Avoiding irritation is essential since it can lead to more dyspigmentation.

Maximize tolerability – adapalene and low concentration tretinoin or tazarotene are a good starting point.  Eliminate any irritating scrubs and other skincare products.  Use noncomedogenic moisturizers concurrently.

Disorders That Disproportionately Affect Patients of Color

Pseudofolliculitis barbae

Findings consist of papules and prominent hyperpigmentation.  This process can also trigger keloid formation. While more common in men, women with hirsutism may also develop PFB. It results from a foreign body reaction to hair reentering the dermis.

A very effective strategy is to discontinue shaving.  You may have to write letters to some patients’ employers in order to excuse them from shaving (Dr. Alexis keeps a form letter on file in his practice).

Chemical depilatory agents are a decent option.  Barium sulfide powder and calcium thioglycolate cream can be used every 2-4 days.  However, they can cause irritant dermatitis. Some patients may also find success by modifying their shaving practices.  Don’t assume your patients know how to shave – educate them.  Electric clippers are a good option – have patients leave 0.5-1 mm stubble. Traditionally single blade manual razors have been recommended.

One study sought to quantify the impact of blade number on PFB – 90 African American men were assigned to shave with a different number of blades.  There was no difference between any of the groups and everyone got better.

A small study showed decreased severity of PFB with daily shaving vs twice weekly shaving.

Dr. Alexis has a handout for patients with shaving instructions: before shaving use a mild cleanser and use a wash cloth in a circular motion to free hairs.  Use clean and sharp razor, shaving in the direction of hair growth.  Use topicals after such as clindamycin lotion or topical dapsone.  Apply a topical retinoid nightly. Avoid pulling or plucking embedded hairs, shaving against the grain.

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Skin of Color Update Announces 2019 Didactic, Case-Based Lectures, Hands-On-Training and Live Demonstrations

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The medical education event focused on the dermatologic treatment of skin of color has a new name. Skin of Color Update, previously the Skin of Color Seminar Series, provides dermatologists with evidence-based research and practical pearls in treating skin of color, including patients with multiracial backgrounds.

“Just as the treatment of skin of color has evolved, this event has also evolved,” says Skin of Color Update co-chair and founding dermatologist Eliot Battle, MD. “Thanks to audience feedback, nearly all general sessions will have additional time for Q&A, making this year’s event the most interactive yet.”

Skin of Color Update will now be held annually in the fall. The 2019 event will be held September 7 and 8 at the Crowne Plaza Times Square in New York.

Skin of Color Update uses a didactic, case-based approach through lectures, hands-on-training and live demonstrations. Co-founding dermatologist Andrew Alexis, MD, also serves as an event co-chair. Common skin, hair and nail conditions in diverse populations will be covered. In addition, advanced treatment protocols for pigmentary and hair disorders will be shared during mini symposiums.

Sessions will address medical, surgical and cosmetic dermatology. New sessions include:

  • “Challenging Challenges: Hidradenitis Suppurativa and the Skin of Color Patient” with Ted Rosen, MD
  • “Current Understanding and Novel Innovations in Photoprotection” with Henry Lim, MD
  • “Diagnosis and Management of Vitiligo in Skin of Color Patients: Where Do We Stand?” with Pearl Grimes, MD
  • Laser and Device-Based Treatment of Scars” with Paul Friedman, MD
  • “Surgical Approaches for Keloids” with Maritza Perez, MD

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Skin of Color Update Co-Chair Dr. Eliot Battle Shares Insights into 2019 Faculty and Topics

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Skin of Color Update Co-Chair, Dr. Eliot Battle, discusses the elite faculty lineup and topics planned this year including hair loss, keloids, rosacea, acne, lasers, aesthetic treatments, skin cancer, medical dermatology, melasma, hyperpigmentation, vitiligo, inflammatory diseases and much, much more!

Skin of Color Update 2019 (previously Skin of Color Seminar Series) is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI. Attendees leave with critical annual updates and fresh practical pearls in skin of color dermatology.

Join us this year in New York City, September 7-8, 2019! Register today at https://skinofcolorupdate.com/registration-hotel-2019/

Co-Chair Dr. Alexis Shares the Exciting 2019 Program Highlights

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Skin of Color Update 2019 (previously Skin of Color Seminar Series) is the largest CE event dedicated to trending evidence-based research and new practical pearls for treating skin types III – VI. Attendees leave with critical annual updates and fresh practical pearls in skin of color dermatology. Earn CE in New York City with direct access to elite experts and an experience unmatched by any other event in dermatology.

Medical Updates in Skin of Color

Medical Updates in Skin of Color

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During the 16th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetics and Surgical Conference, ANGELO LANDRISCINA, MD had the pleasure of taking part in the Resident Career Development Mentorship Program (a program supported by an educational grant from Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.). and was paired with Dr. Andrew Alexis, Co-Chair of the Skin of Color Update.

Dr. Alexis lectured on new developments in the treatment of skin of color focusing on two prevalent conditions: hyperpigmentation and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA). Below are Dr. Landriscina’s takeaways and pearls from this lecture.

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Skin of Color STD Ted Rosen

Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Skin of Color: Crisis State

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As one would expect, Dr. Ted Rosen’s session at the Skin of Color Seminar Series 2018 (now Skin of Color Update) on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in Skin of Color was engaging, informative, and shocking to many in the audience. Dr. Rosen addressed the increasing rates of STDs in the United States and highlighted the alarming predominance in non-white ethnic groups.

*Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined, and marked with asterisks.

The STD data from 2017 is worse than 2016, which was worse than 2015, and so on. *Every year, 20×106new STDs are diagnosed!*Over 50% of Americans will contract an STD during their lifetime, often before the age of 25. Teenagers are at high risk as well, with 1 in 4 teenagers developing an STD. First piece of good news: *Sex in high school is decreasing*in the US, with the exception of a few states(from east to west): North Carolina, Michigan, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Arizona. Perhaps this will correlate with decreased STD transmission among teenagers in the coming years.

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Excerpt provided with permission. Originally published by Next Steps in Dermatology. All rights reserved.