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Luciana Nofal

Diversity in Dermatology Residency application Process

Diversity in the Specialty of Dermatology

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Dermatology has the most expensive residency application process.  Refinery29 recently published an editorial article on diversity in dermatology, looking at medical school, residency and training. Nathan Rojek, MD and Next Steps in Dermatology reviewed the dermatology residency application process and put the statistics into numbers.

Dermatology is at high risk of becoming a specialty comprised of physicians that do not come close to representing the socio-economic diversity of the patients in this country. It is critical that those of us in the dermatology community make the necessary changes to attract the most promising medical students from all walks of life; otherwise we risk alienating the people we’ve vowed to help.

 

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Excerpt provided with permission. Originally published by Next Steps in Dermatology. All rights reserved.

Annual Skin of Color Issue from the Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD)

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US Dermatologists, Dermatology Residents and Dermatology NP and PAs can create a free account on JDDonline.com to read the following Skin of Color annual issue highlights:

Patient-focused Solutions in Rosacea Management: Treatment Challenges in Special Patient Groups by Ahuva Cices MD and Andrew F. Alexis MD MPH aims to expand awareness of the impact of rosacea on QoL of patients of all ages, genders, and skin types. (CE credit is available)

Myths and Knowledge Gaps in the Aesthetic Treatment of Patients With Skin of Color, Andrew Alexis, MD et al.,  identifies knowledge gaps and myths concerning facial aesthetic treatment in individuals with SOC.

An online study was designed to survey facial aesthetic concerns, treatment priorities, and future treatment considerations in 2 companion articles, Understanding the Female Hispanic and Latino American Facial Aesthetic Patient and Understanding the Female Asian American Facial Aesthetic Patient.

In Vitro and In Vivo Efficacy and Tolerability of a Non-Hydroquinone, Multi-Action Skin Tone Correcting Cream Pearl Grimes, MD evaluates an alternative to HQ for improving skin tone.

A Survey-Based Comparison of Sun Safety Practices in a Representative Cohort of the General Public Versus Attendees of a Skin Cancer Screening examines sun-protection practices.

Topical Ozenoxacin Cream 1% for Impetigo: A Review explores the challenges of treating impetigo and growing concern of antimicrobial resistance.

Uncommon localizations of PLEVA pose a diagnostic challenge in An Atypical Presentation of PLEVA: Case Report and Review of the Literature

 

Medical Updates in Skin of Color

Medical Updates in Skin of Color

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During the 16th Annual ODAC Dermatology, Aesthetics and Surgical Conference, ANGELO LANDRISCINA, MD had the pleasure of taking part in the Resident Career Development Mentorship Program (a program supported by an educational grant from Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc.). and was paired with Dr. Andrew Alexis, Co-Chair of the Skin of Color Update.

Dr. Alexis lectured on new developments in the treatment of skin of color focusing on two prevalent conditions: hyperpigmentation and central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA). Below are Dr. Landriscina’s takeaways and pearls from this lecture.

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The Skin Lightening Dilemma: A Candid Conversation with the Experts

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This article features a recap of the Skin Lightening Panel at the 2018 Skin of Color Seminar Series, now known as the Skin of Color Update. Dr. Bridget Kaufman, onsite correspondent for the meeting, shares highlights directly from the experts, Drs. Eliot Battle, Seemal Desai and Valerie Callender.

Each panelist started with a PowerPoint presentation on skin lightening, followed by a panel discussion. Rather than reporting on the session chronologically, I have divided the session into key points. Under each key point, I have indicated each faculty member’s contributions and opinions on the topic.  *Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined and marked with asterisks.

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2018 Scientific Poster Abstracts from Skin of Color Update

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A selection of scientific poster abstracts from Skin of Color Seminar Series 2018 (now known as Skin of Color Update.) Thank you to our poster presentations and faculty. 


 

Cutaneous Crohn’s Disease of the Vulva in an Elderly African American Patient

Authors: Leah Wells, MS & David Kent, MD

We present a case of a 79-year-old African American female with painful vulvar ulcers of several years duration. She presented to an OB-GYN and was tested for syphilis, lymphoproliferative granulomatosis, herpes, TB, and fungal infection. Once these etiologies were ruled out, she was referred to dermatology where the knife-like lesions prompted suspicion for cutaneous Crohn’s disease. However, the patient had not been previously diagnosed with Crohn’s and had no gastrointestinal symptoms of the disease. Biopsy revealed non-caseating granulomas, confirming a probable diagnosis of vulvar Crohn’s. The patient was initially treated with oral steroids, and her lesions showed improvement after one month of therapy. Due to the severity of her case, infliximab was recently added to her regimen to further promote healing.
Less than 200 cases of vulvar Crohn’s disease have been reported in the literature. The mean age of onset is 35, making our patient’s advanced age uncommon. Vulvar Crohn’s is often difficult to diagnose, due to the multitude of differential diagnoses for genital ulcers. Further, a significant amount of patients with vulvar Crohn’s disease will not exhibit any gastrointestinal symptoms and vulvar Crohn’s will be the initial manifestation of underlying disease. As a result, many patients suffer from the disease for many years before it is recognized as cutaneous Crohn’s. A biopsy is necessary to achieve definite diagnosis.
Treatment recommendations for vulvar Crohn’s have not been well-established. However, initial treatment often includes metronidazole, steroids, and/or immunosuppressants. Recent case-reports have shown success in treating severe, or refractory, vulvar Crohn’s with infliximab.  Read More

Seemal Desai Melasma Skin of Color Update

Melasma and PIH – Disorders of Hyperpigmentation

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During his talk at the 2018 Skin of Color Seminar Series (now known as the Skin of Color Update), Dr. Seemal Desai discussed the treatment of melasma with a particular emphasis on new and emerging therapies. Dr. Bridget Kaufman, onsite correspondent for the meeting, shares highlights directly from the talk.  *Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined, and marked with asterisks.

Dr. Desai started by stressing the importance of having an honest and upfront conversation with your melasma patients about realistic expectations for treatment. *You must emphasize to patients that this is a chronic condition and set their expectations accordingly.*While improvement with treatment is likely, there will always be underlying pigmentary changes even despite treatment. Patients must understand from the beginning that they cannot be cured of this condition.

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Excerpt provided with permission. Originally published by Next Steps in Dermatology. All rights reserved.
Skin of Color STD Ted Rosen

Sexually Transmitted Diseases in Skin of Color: Crisis State

By | Skin of Color Update Agenda | No Comments

As one would expect, Dr. Ted Rosen’s session at the Skin of Color Seminar Series 2018 (now Skin of Color Update) on Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) in Skin of Color was engaging, informative, and shocking to many in the audience. Dr. Rosen addressed the increasing rates of STDs in the United States and highlighted the alarming predominance in non-white ethnic groups.

*Clinical pearls* from this session are bolded, underlined, and marked with asterisks.

The STD data from 2017 is worse than 2016, which was worse than 2015, and so on. *Every year, 20×106new STDs are diagnosed!*Over 50% of Americans will contract an STD during their lifetime, often before the age of 25. Teenagers are at high risk as well, with 1 in 4 teenagers developing an STD. First piece of good news: *Sex in high school is decreasing*in the US, with the exception of a few states(from east to west): North Carolina, Michigan, North Dakota, Wyoming, and Arizona. Perhaps this will correlate with decreased STD transmission among teenagers in the coming years.

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Excerpt provided with permission. Originally published by Next Steps in Dermatology. All rights reserved.

The Use of Deoxycholic Acid for the Clinical Reduction of Excess Submental Fat in Indian Patients

By | SOC Manuscripts | No Comments

Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(3):266-272.

Debraj Shome MD FRCS, FACS, MBA Stuti Khare MD, Rinky Kapoor MD

The injectable adipocytolytic drug deoxycholic acid (DCA) is the first pharmacological intervention approved for the reduction of submental fat (SMF) and offers an alternative to invasive measures to improve the submental profile and the cervico-mental angle. DCA injection (ATX-101, Kybella [United States], Belkyra [Canada]; Kythera Biopharmaceuticals, Inc., Westlake Village, CA, acquired by Allergan, Inc.), are proprietary formulations of synthetically derived DCA that is FDA approved for improvement in the appearance of moderate to severe convexity or fullness associated with SMF.

Aim: As none of the aforementioned are available in India, we undertook this study to study the efficacy of generic DCA for SMF reduction in Indian patients.

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Latino JDD Rendon

Dermatological Concerns in the Latino Population

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Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2019;18(3 Suppl):s112-114. 

Marta I. Rendon MD 

The Journal of Drugs in Dermatology (JDD) published a supplement on the dermatological concerns in the Latino population authored by Marta I. Rendon, MD.

The Latino, or Hispanics in the United States, are the drivers behind demographic growth. They are heterogeneous in many dimensions related to health risks and dermatological conditions. Understanding the heterogeneity and clinical manifestation of skin concerns in such population is essential for health care providers. At the annual meeting of the American Academy of Dermatology in 2018, Dr. Rendon chaired a special symposium titled “Skin Issues in Latino Patients”, with the objective of training clinical practitioners how to better provide care and education to our diverse patients.

Click “Download Original Article” here

  • Introduction: Dermatological Concerns in the Latino Population Marta I. Rendon MD
  • Hyperpigmentation Disorders in Hispanic Population in the United States Marta I. Rendon MD
  • Disorders of Hypopigmentation Yemisi Dina BS, Jacqueline McKesey MD MS, Amit G. Pandya MD
  • Skin Cancer in Hispanics in the United States Maritza I. Perez MD
  • Photoaging and Photoprotection in United States Hispanic Population Qian Zheng MD PhD, Janet Wangari-Talbot PhD, Charbel Bouez PhD, and Michele Verschoore MD
  • Acne and Rosacea: Special Considerations in the Treatment of Patients With Latin American Ancestry Mercedes Florez-White MD
  • Cosmetic Laser Procedures in Latin Skin Sheila Jalalat MD, Eduardo Weiss MD
Skin of Color Update CCCA

Pearls from Primary Cicatricial Alopecias in Black Women

By | Sessions, Skin of Color Update Agenda | No Comments

Hair Apparent: A Multi-Part Series on Hair Disorders – Part II

Dermatology residents from throughout the Washington DC area recently convened at a recent hair disorders symposium, where distinguished experts in the field of hair disorders discussed the evaluation, work-up, and treatment of a wide variety of alopecias and scalp disorders. A treasure trove of clinical pearls was shared along the way, and the attendees learned a host of new strategies to apply to the management of hair loss, which is both widely prevalent and frequently undertreated. Attend Skin of Color Update in to learn more or continuing reading below.

This post is the second of a multi-part series that summarizes salient points from each of the lectures, as well as strategies that residents can add to their alopecia armamentarium.

 

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