Tag

Lasers

Cosmetic Needs Differ for Skin of Color Patients

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SOURCE: Dermatology Times

If a Caucasian patient comes to my practice they will be looking for treatment for sun damage, wrinkles and capillaries, whereas, if it is a person of color, they will be looking for treatment for dark spots — dark spots from hair, dark spots from melasma, dark spots from scars, says Eliot F. Battle, Jr., M.D., CEO and Co-Founder, Cultura Dermatology and Laser Center, Washington, D.C.

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Parameters for Success – Treating Skin of Color Patients with Dr. Eliot Battle

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Dr. Battle is CEO and founder of Washington, DC’s renowned Cultura Cosmetic Dermatology and Laser Center, a ground-breaking medical practice merging dermatology, laser surgery, plastic surgery, and spa therapy. His office is always filled with physicians seeking advance training and patients from all over the world who seek out his expertise. His 3 year pioneering research at Harvard helped to invent the new generation of non-invasive “color blind” cosmetic lasers opening up the field to patients of all cultures, regardless of skin of color or ethnicity. He is one of the most sought out teachers and lecturers in the field of cosmetic laser therapy.

Dr. Battle is the Co-Chair of the Skin of Color Seminar Series, May 5-6, 2018 in New York City. During the 2017 event, he shared his top parameters for success in treating skin of color patients with lasers and devices.

Parameters for Success – Treating Skin of Color Patients

  • Use the Correct Laser or Device
    • Choose the Appropriate Wavelength
    • Stay within Safe Parameters
    • Use Aggressive Skin Cooling
  • Become an Expert
  • Choose only treatments with proven success including:
    • Hair Removal
    • Pigment Improvement
    • Texture Improvement
    • Skin Tightening
    • Body Contouring
  • Do No Harm – Treat Conservatively
    • “Don’t rely on most parameters supplied by the laser manufacturers.  Treat more conservatively and minimize erythema or edema.”
  • Stay Under the Erythema & Edema Threshold
    • “When treating patients with skin of color, stay under the erythema threshold. Longer wavelengths, lower fluences, longer pulse durations, maximize cooling. Skin Cooling – Thermal  side effects happens when the epidermis heats up > 45 degrees. Treat all Skin of Color patients at max. of 1 hertz.”
  • Manage Patient Expectations 

Dr. Battle will share insights into his extensive laser knowledge at SOCSS 2018 where he will present the latest research, practical pearls and techniques during in-depth sessions including:

  • Live Laser and Device Demonstrations
  • Updates on New Technologies for Treating Aesthetic Concerns in Skin of Color
  • Ten Easy Steps to Improving Patient Experiences and Your Happiness
  • Minimizing Laser Complications in Skin of Color Patients
  • The Masters Share: Aesthetic Treatments Pearls in Skin of Color Patients  – Panel Discussion

Successful Treatment of Keloid With Fractionated Carbon Dioxide (CO2) Laser and Laser-Assisted Drug Delivery of Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment in an African-American Man

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Source: J Drugs Dermatol. 2017;16(9):925-927.

Ekaterina Kraeva MD, Derek Ho MD, and Jared Jagdeo MD MS

Keloids are fibrous growths that occur as a result of abnormal response to dermal injury. Keloids are cosmetically disfiguring and may impair function, often resulting in decreased patient quality-of-life. Treatment of keloids remains challenging, and rate of recurrence is high. We present a case of a 39-year-old African-American man (Fitzpatrick VI) with a 10-year history of keloid, who was successfully treated with eight sessions of fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser immediately followed by laser-assisted drug delivery (LADD) of topical triamcinolone acetonide (TAC) ointment and review the medical literature on fractionated CO2 laser treatment of keloids. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of successful treatment of a keloid using combination therapy of fractionated CO2 laser and LADD with topical TAC ointment in an African-American man (Fitzpatrick VI) with excellent cosmetic results sustained at 22 months post-treatment. We believe that this combination treatment modality may be safe and efficacious for keloids in skin of color (Fitzpatrick IV-VI) and other patients. This case highlights the ability of laser surgeons to safely use fractionated CO2 lasers in patients of all skin colors.

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